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FLSA Status of Part-time Employees

Can part-time employees be hourly when their full-time colleagues are salaried? Can part-time employees be paid by the hour although their full-time colleagues (same job title, same duties) are paid on a salary basis? The Department of Labor (DOL) says that it is possible. It depends on the amount of pay received by each employee and their job duties. What is FLSA? The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a law dating back from the Roosevelt area which still creates headaches for employers today. It requires that most employees be paid at least the federal minimum wage ($7.25) for all hours worked, …

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Generations or Stages in Life

Generational Differences or Stages in Life? Bill Boyer, business coach at Tidewater CEO, recently sent me an article from Fast Company about Millennials in the workplace. The article made the point that Millenials – who will become the majority of employees by 2015 – clash with the work culture espoused by Boomer and Gen Xers. I do not think generations drastically different from each other. When working on a European recruitment strategy for Procter &Gamble, our market research found that top students across the continent valued working with like-minded people. Young graduates wanted work on projects that make a difference. …

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Turnover Myths Part 5

Turnover Myths Part 5 – Is Turnover Always Bad? Myth # 5– Turnover is always bad. It is disruptive to business. The smaller the business, the more disruptive it is. Turnover has a cost. For all these reasons and more, turnover must be avoided. Reality – Sometimes change is good because it brings new players. Whether employees are fired, retire, or get another job, turnover can be an opportunity for employers to develop new employees who are excited about the company. Some turnover is actually good for the company especially in the case of those overpaid, under-performing workers. Turnover is a symptom of …

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Turnover Myths Part 4

Myth #4: Low turnover is always good Reality: Low turnover can be the sign of a great organization. Employees only stay if they are satisfied, right? Not necessarily. Employees stay with companies for all kinds of reasons and it may have nothing to do with job satisfaction. Low turnover can be a sign that employees are overpaid or company benefits are too good to leave. In recent years, “at least I have a job” has been the operating principle for many dissatisfied employees. Although a large majority of employees are disengaged at work (Gallup 2013), they are not willing to …

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Turnover Myths Part 3

Myth #3: Exit Interviews are a waste of time Reality: The exit interview is an opportunity to gain insight into what drives employee turnover. Making an assumption, even an educated guess about the reasons employees leave, compromises your exit data. The best way to make sure you understand the drivers behind an employee’s decision to leave is to ask them directly. HR leaders can provide valuable insight by managing a meaningful exit interview process. Stephanie Teasdale, HR Manager with Ferguson Enterprises in Newport News VA, offers tips to her success. “I found that once I revised the exit interview to …

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Turnover Myths part 2

Myth #2: Measuring turnover isn’t important Reality: Costs associated with turnover are significant and you should know how much it is costing your business when employee leave. The resignation of an employee earning $60,000 a year can cost a company anywhere from $12 – 30K in cumulative turnover costs. Executive level positions can reach 100-200% of base salary. Seem high? Direct hiring costs and indirect costs combine to make turnover an expensive proposition. Turnover is one of the few costs that HR and the leadership can predict, plan for, and control. In fact, basic turnover is among the easiest of …

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Turnover Myths part 1

Myth 1: You Can’t Control Employee Turnover Reality: Many variables drive turnover in a company. Management style, compensation, and the opportunity to increase professional development are among the top reasons people cite for leaving. Although some factors are difficult to control (employee’s commute, a lifestyle or career change, or spouse relocation), ensuring employees are engaged, rewarded, and retained are absolutely factors that can be controlled by employers: Recruitment: Managing and controlling turnover actually begins during the recruitment process. Being certain the right candidate is placed in the appropriate role with well- defined expectations is paramount. The first 6 months in …

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How to Dress for Success in the Summer & Avoid Employee Meltdowns

When it comes to employee relations, the mundane topics can be the most perplexing to employers. One of my clients regularly laments the lack of dress sense of her employees. During the summer, many companies allow employees to dress more casually. However, what constitutes appropriate casual business attire is often left to the interpretation of employees. Six weeks into the summer, you know what I mean. The ladies reveal more skin, bra straps, flip flops, and skimpy tops. Men show up in shorts, questionable T-shirts, and button down shirts with too many buttons down. Surely none of those fit the …